Refereed Publications
Year Author Word



1990

Camargo, S. J. and H. Tasso, 1990: Self-Similar Statistics in Mhd Turbulence. Zeitschrift Fur Naturforschung Section a-a Journal of Physical Sciences, 45(5): 603-608.
Cane, M. A., M. Munnich and S. E. Zebiak, 1990: A Study of Self-Excited Oscillations of the Tropical Ocean - Atmosphere System .1. Linear-Analysis. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 47(13): 1562-1577. PDF
Cardone, V. J., J. G. Greenwood and M. A. Cane, 1990: On Trends in Historical Marine Wind Data. Journal of Climate, 3(1): 113-127. PDF
Chen, D. and D. P. Wang, 1990: Simulating the Time-Variable Coastal Upwelling During Code-2. Journal of Marine Research, 48(2): 335-358.
Gordon, A. L. and B. A. Huber, 1990: Southern-Ocean Winter Mixed Layer. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 95(C7): 11655-11672.
Gordon, A. L. and W. F. Haxby, 1990: Agulhas Eddies Invade the South-Atlantic - Evidence from Geosat Altimeter and Shipboard Conductivity-Temperature-Depth Survey. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 95(C3): 3117-.
Held, I. M. and M. Ting, 1990: Orographic Versus Thermal Forcing of Stationary Waves - the Importance of the Mean Low-Level Wind. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 47(4): 495-500.
Keys, H. J. R., S. S. Jacobs and D. Barnett, 1990: The Calving and Drift of Iceberg B-9 in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Antarctic Science, 2(3): 243-257.
Marra, J., R. W. Houghton and C. Garside, 1990: Phytoplankton Growth at the Shelf-Break Front in the Middle Atlantic Bight. Journal of Marine Research, 48(4): 851-868. ABS
Martinson, D. G. and C. Wamser, 1990: Ice Drift and Momentum Exchange in Winter Antarctic Pack Ice. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 95(C2): 1741-1755.
Martinson, D. G., 1990: Evolution of the Southern-Ocean Winter Mixed Layer and Sea Ice - Open Ocean Deep-Water Formation and Ventilation. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 95(C7): 11641-11654.
Martinson, D. G., 1990: Southern-Ocean Sea-Ice Interaction - Implications for Climate and Modeling. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh-Earth Sciences, 81: 397-405. ABS
Moustapha, S. H. , S. C. Kacker and L. B. Tremblay, 1990: An Improved Incidence Losses Prediction Method for Turbine Airfoils. ASME Journal of Turbomachinery, 112: 267-276.
Ting, M. F. and I. M. Held, 1990: The Stationary Wave Response to a Tropical SST Anomaly in an Idealized GCM. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 47(21): 2546-2566.
Wang, D. P., D. Chen and T. J. Sherwin, 1990: Coupling between Mixing and Advection in a Shallow Sea Front. Continental Shelf Research, 10(2): 123-136.



Abstracts

Marra, J., R. W. Houghton and C. Garside, 1990: Phytoplankton Growth at the Shelf-Break Front in the Middle Atlantic Bight. Journal of Marine Research, 48(4): 851-868.

The summertime front near the shelf break in the Middle Atlantic Bight is both thermohaline and baroclinic. Near the surface, large gradients of temperature (T) and salinity (S) exist with little cross-frontal variation in density. At depths > 50 m, an isopycnal boundary separates Slope Water from colder, fresher shelf water. Higher concentrations of chlorophyll are found in the upper part of the front, between water types of shelf and Slope Water origin. Calculations show also that the front is a region of enhanced phytoplankton growth. It is proposed that the relative fertility of the front is the result of large-scale deformations of the T/S boundary between shelf and Slope Water. The entrainment of deep shelf water along the shallowing, seaward-sloping, isopycnals in the deeper part of the front by these large-scale perturbations bring turbid, nutrient-rich water into clearer water that is also nutrient poor. The combination of this nutrient enrichment and a well-lighted water column makes the front more productive than elsewhere.


back to top




Martinson, D. G., 1990: Southern-Ocean Sea-Ice Interaction - Implications for Climate and Modeling. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh-Earth Sciences, 81: 397-405.

The ocean/sea-ice interaction of the Antarctic open ocean region is described through a one-dimensional model. The model includes processes responsible for maintaining stability in this marginally stable region and reveals the importance of the various processes controlling deep water formation/ventilation and sea-ice thickness and their sensitivity to climate change. This information is used to estimate changes, as they impact water column stability, induced by glacial conditions. Increased stability is conducive to greater ice cover and less deep water formation/ventilation; decreased stability conducive to the opposite.

back to top




The database was updated today.

Maintained by: Virginia DiBlasi, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University