Refereed Publications
Year Author Word



2002

Liu, J. P., D. G. Martinson, X. J. Yuan and D. Rind, 2002: Evaluating Antarctic sea ice variability and its teleconnections in global climate models. International Journal of Climatology, 22(8): 885-900. ABS
Liu, J. P., X. J. Yuan, D. Rind and D. G. Martinson, 2002: Mechanism study of the ENSO and southern high latitude climate teleconnections. Geophysical Research Letters, 29(14): doi:10.1029/2002GL015143. PDF ABS
Martinson, D. G., 2002: Climate variability: decadal to centennial variability. In: J.R.H.e. al. (Editor), Encyclopedia of atmospheric sciences. Academic Press, London, pp. 418-424.



Abstracts

Liu, J. P., D. G. Martinson, X. J. Yuan and D. Rind, 2002: Evaluating Antarctic sea ice variability and its teleconnections in global climate models. International Journal of Climatology, 22(8): 885-900.

This study evaluates simulated Antarctic sea ice edge (SIE) variability and its teleconnections in three global coupled climate models (GISS, NCAR and GFDL) against the observations. All models do a reasonable job in simulating the seasonal advance and retreat of the Antarctic sea ice fields. The simulated GISS and NCAR SIE distributions are in agreement with observations in summer and autumn, whereas the GFDL model does best in spring and winter. A common problem is the poor simulation of the observed SIE in the Weddell Sea. All models are not particularly good at simulating the observed regionally varying SIE trends. A comparison of dominant empirical orthogonal function modes of surface air temperature (SAT) variability in each model associated with observed modes show that the models generally capture features of the more prominent covarying spatial patterns such as an El Nino-southern oscillation (ENSO)-like pattern in the tropical Pacific.

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Liu, J. P., X. J. Yuan, D. Rind and D. G. Martinson, 2002: Mechanism study of the ENSO and southern high latitude climate teleconnections. Geophysical Research Letters, 29(14): doi:10.1029/2002GL015143.

Evidence of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) teleconnections in the southern high latitude climate has been identified, although the mechanisms that might lead to such far-reaching teleconnections remain unresolved. Here we propose one such mechanism-the regional mean meridional atmospheric circulation (the regional Ferrel Cell)-responsible for the covariability of the ENSO and Antarctic Dipole (ADP; a predominant interannually-varying signal in the southern high latitudes). It is found that the altered storm tracks associated with the ENSO variability influence the regional Ferrel Cell indirectly by changing the meridional eddy heat flux divergence and convergence, and shifting the latent heat release zone. The changes of the regional Ferrel Cell then influence the southern high latitude climate by modulating the mean meridional heat flux.


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The database was updated today.

Maintained by: Virginia DiBlasi, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University