Refereed Publications
Year Author Word



2005

Camargo, S. J. and A. H. Sobel, 2005: Western North Pacific tropical cyclone intensity and ENSO. Journal of Climate, 18(15): 2996-3006. ABS
Camargo, S. J., 2005: Western North Pacific typhoon season. State of the Climate in 2004, 86(6): S29-S32.
Camargo, S. J., A. G. Barnston and S. E. Zebiak, 2005: A statistical assessment of tropical cyclone activity in atmospheric general circulation models. Tellus Series a-Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography, 57(4): 589-604. ABS
Landman, W. A., A. Seth and S. J. Camargo, 2005: The effect of regional climate model domain choice on the simulation of tropical cyclone-like vortices in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Journal of Climate, 18(8): 1263-1274. ABS
Sobel, A. H. and S. J. Camargo, 2005: Influence of western North Pacific tropical cyclones on their large-scale environment. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 62(9): 3396-3407. ABS



Abstracts

Camargo, S. J. and A. H. Sobel, 2005: Western North Pacific tropical cyclone intensity and ENSO. Journal of Climate, 18(15): 2996-3006.

The influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on tropical cyclone intensity in the western North Pacific basin is examined. Accumulated cyclone energy (ACE), constructed from the best-track dataset for the region for the period 1950-2002, and other related variables are analyzed. ACE is positively correlated with ENSO indices. This and other statistics of the interannually varying tropical cyclone distribution are used to show that there is a tendency in El Niño years toward tropical cyclones that are both more intense and longer-lived than in La Niña years. ACE leads ENSO indices: during the peak season (northern summer and fall), ACE is correlated approximately as strongly with ENSO indices up to six months later (northern winter), as well as simultaneously. It appears that not all of this lead-lag relationship is easily explained by the autocorrelation of the ENSO indices, though much of it is. Interannual variations in the annual mean lifetime, intensity, and number of tropical cyclones all contribute to the ENSO signal in ACE, though the lifetime effect appears to be the most important of the three.


back to top




Camargo, S. J., A. G. Barnston and S. E. Zebiak, 2005: A statistical assessment of tropical cyclone activity in atmospheric general circulation models. Tellus Series a-Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography, 57(4): 589-604.

The properties of tropical cyclones in three low-resolution atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) in seven ocean basins are discussed. The models are forced by prescribed, observed sea surface temperatures over a period of 40 yr, and their simulations of tropical cyclone activity are compared with observations. The model cyclone characteristics considered include genesis position, number of cyclones per year, seasonality, accumulated cyclone energy, track locations, and number of storm days. Correlations between model and observed interannual variations of these characteristics are evaluated. The models are found able to reproduce the basic features of observed tropical cyclone behavior such as seasonality, general location and interannual variability, but with identifiable biases. A bias correction is applied to the tropical cyclone variables of the three models. The three AGCMs have different levels of realism in simulating different aspects of tropical cyclone activity in different ocean basins. Some strengths and weaknesses in simulating certain tropical cyclone activity variables are common to the three models, while others are unique to each model and/or basin. Although the overall skill of the models in reproducing observed interannual variability of tropical cyclone variables has not surpassed or often even equalled that of statistical models, there exists potential for higher future skills using improved versions of dynamical approaches.


back to top




Landman, W. A., A. Seth and S. J. Camargo, 2005: The effect of regional climate model domain choice on the simulation of tropical cyclone-like vortices in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Journal of Climate, 18(8): 1263-1274.

A regional climate model is tested for several domain configurations over the southwestern Indian Ocean to examine the ability of the model to reproduce observed cyclones and their landfalling tracks. The interaction between large-scale and local terrain forcing of tropical storms approaching and transiting the island landmass of Madagascar makes the southwestern Indian Ocean a unique and interesting study area. In addition, tropical cyclones across the southern Indian Ocean re likely to be significantly affected by the large-scale zonal flow. Therefore, the effects of model domain si e and the positioning of its lateral boundaries on the simulation of tropical cyclone-like vortices and their tracks on a seasonal time scale are investigated. Four tropical cyclones, which occurred over the southwestern Indian Ocean in January of the years 1995-97, are studied, and four domains are tested. The regional climate model is driven by atmospheric lateral boundary conditions that are derived from large-scale meteorological analyses. The use of analyzed boundary forcing enables comparison with observed cyclones in these tests. Simulations are performed using a 60-km horizontal resolution and for an extended time integration of about 6 weeks. Results show that the positioning of the eastern boundary of the regional model domain is of major importance in the life cycle of simulated tropical cyclone-like vortices: a vortex entering through the eastern boundary of the regional model is generally well simulated. The size of the domain also has a bearing on the ability of the regional model to simulate vortices in the Mozambique Channel, and the island landmass of Madagascar additionally influences storm tracks. These results show that the regional model can produce cyclonelike vortices and their tracks (with some deficiencies) given analyzed lateral boundary forcing. Statistical analyses of GCM-driven nested model ensemble integrations are now required to further address predictive skill of cyclones in the southwestern Indian Ocean and to test if the model can realistically simulate tropical storm genesis as opposed to advecting existing tropical disturbances entering through the model boundaries.


back to top




Sobel, A. H. and S. J. Camargo, 2005: Influence of western North Pacific tropical cyclones on their large-scale environment. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 62(9): 3396-3407.

The authors investigate the influence of western North Pacific (WNP) tropical cyclones (TCs) on their large-scale environment by lag regressing various large-scale climate variables [atmospheric temperature, winds, relative vorticity, outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), column water vapor, and sea surface temperature (SST)] on an index of TC activity [accumulated cyclone energy (ACE)] on a weekly time scale. At all leads and lags out to several months, persistent, slowly evolving signals indicative of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon are seen in all the variables, reflecting the known seasonal relationship of TCs in the WNP to ENSO. Superimposed on this are more rapidly evolving signals, at leads and lags of one or two weeks, directly associated with the TCs themselves. These include anomalies of positive low-level vorticity, negative OLR, and high column water vapor associated with anomalously positive ACE, found in the region where TCs most commonly form and develop. In the same region, lagging ACE by a week or two and so presumably reflecting the influence of TCs on the local environment, signals are found that might be expected to negatively influence the environment for later cyclogenesis. These signals include an SST reduction in the primary region of TC activity, and a reduction in column water vapor, and increase in OLR that may or may not be a result of the SST reduction.


back to top




The database was updated today.

Maintained by: Virginia DiBlasi, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University