Refereed Publications
Year Author Word



2010

Burgman, R., R. Seager, A. C. Clement and C. Herweijer, 2010: Role of tropical Pacific SSTs in global medieval hydroclimate: A modeling study. Geophys. Res. Lett., 37(L06705): doi:10.1029/2009GL042239. PDF
Camargo, S.J. and A.H. Sobel, 2010: Revisiting the influence of the Quasi-biennial oscillation on tropical cyclone activity. J. Climate, 23: 5810- 5825, doi: 10.1175/2010JCLI3575.1.
Camargo, S.J., 2010: Tropical Cyclones, Western North Pacific Basin. In: D.S. Arndt, M.O. Baringer and M.R. Johnson (Editors), State of the Climate in 2009. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society pp. S91-S94.
Camargo, S.J., A.H. Sobel, A.G. Bamston and P.J. Klotzbach, 2010: The influence of natural climate variability, and seasonal forecasts of tropical cyclone activity. In: J.C.L. Chan and J.D. Kepert (Editors), Global Perspectives on Tropical Cyclones, from Science to Mitigation. World Scientific Series on Earth System Science Asia, pp. 325-360.
Cane, M.A., 2010: A moist model monsoon. Nature, 463(14 January 2010): 163-164. PDF
Cane, M.A., 2010: Decadal predictions in demand, Nature Geoscience, Advance online publication, pp. 231-232. PDF
Cook, B., R. Seager and R. Miller, 2010: Atmospheric circulation anomalies during two persistent North American droughts: 1932-1939 and 1948-1957. Climate Dynamics: 10.1007/s00382-010-0807-1. PDF
Cook, E. R., R. Seager, R. R. Heim, R. S. Vose, C. Herweijer and C. Woodhouse, 2010: Megadroughts in North America: placing IPCC projections of hydroclimatic change in a long-term palaeoclimate context. Journal of Quaternary Science, 25(1): 48-61. PDF ABS
Cook, I. B., E.R. Cook, K.J. Anchukaitis, R. Seager and R. L. Miller, 2010: Forced and unforced variability of twentieth century North American droughts and pluvials. Climate Dynamics: DOI 10.1007/s00382-010-0897-9. PDF
Harnik, N., R. Seager, N. Naik(Henderson), M.A. Cane and M. Ting, 2010: The role of linear wave refraction in the transient eddy–mean flow response to tropical Pacific SST anomalies. Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc., 136: 2132-2146. PDF
Hickey, B. M., R. M. Kudela, J. D. Nash, K. W. Bruland, W. T. Peterson, P. MacCready, E. J. Lessard, D. A. Jay, N. S. Banas, A. M. Baptista, E. P. Dever, P. M. Kosro, L. K. Kilcher, A. R. Horner-Devine, E. D. Zaron, R. M. McCabe, J. O. Peterson, P. M. Orton, J. Pan and M. C. Lohan, 2010: River Influences on Shelf Ecosystems: Introduction and synthesis. J. Geophys. Res., 115. PDF ABS
Jacobs, S. S. and C. F. Giulivi, 2010: Large Multidecadal Salinity Trends near the Pacific-Antarctic Continental Margin. Journal of Climate, 23(17): 4508-4524. ABS
Jenkins, A., P. Dutrieux, S. S. Jacobs, S. D. McPhail, J. R. Perrett, A. T. Webb and D. White, 2010: Observations beneath Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica and implications for its retreat. Nature Geoscience, 3(7): 468-472. ABS
Kang, I.-S., D. Kim and J.-S. Kug, 2010: Mechanism for north ward propagation of boreal summer intraseasonal socillation: Convection momentum transport. Geophys. Res. Lett., 37: L24804. PDF
Kossin, J.P., S.J. Camargo and M. Sitkowski, 2010: Climate modulation of North Atlantic hurricane tracks. J. Climate, 23: 3057-3076.
Kushnir, K. and M. Stein, 2010: North Atlantic influence on 19th-20th century rainfall in the Dead Sea watershed, teleconnections with the Sahel, and implication for Holocene climate fluctuations. Quaternary Science Reviews, 29: doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2010.09.004. PDF
Kushnir, Y., R. Seager, M. Ting, N. Naik(Henderson) and J. Nakamura, 2010: Mechanisms of Tropical Atlantic SST Influence on North American Precipitation Variability. Journal of Climate, 23: DOI: 10.1175/2010JCLI3172.1. PDF
Lesperance, M., J.E. Smerdon and H. Beltrami, 2010: Propagation of linear surface air temperature trends into the terrestrial subsurface. J. Geophys. Res., 115(D21115): DOI:10.1029/2010JD014377. PDF
Sarachik, E.S. and M.A. Cane, 2010: The El Niño-Southern Oscillation Phenomenon. Cambridge University Press, London, 384 pp.
Schofield, O., H.W. Ducklow, D.G. Martinson, M.P. Meredith, M.A. Moline and W.R. Fraser, 2010: How Do Polar Marine Ecosystems Respond to Rapid Climate Change? . Science, 328: 1520-1523, doi: 10.1126/science.1185779.
Seager, R. , N. Naik(Henderson), W. Baethgen, A. Robertson, Y. Kushnir, J. Nakamura and S. Jurburg, 2010: Tropical oceanic causes of interannual to multidecadal precipitation variability across southeast South America over the past century. Journal of Climate, 23: DOI: 10.1175/2010JCLI3578.1. PDF
Seager, R., N. Naik(Henderson) and G. A. Vecchi, 2010: Thermodynamic and Dynamic Mechanisms for Large-Scale Changes in the Hydrological Cycle in Response to Global Warming. Journal of Climate, 23(17): 4651-4668. PDF ABS
Seager, R., N. Naik(Henderson), M. Ting, M. A. Cane, N. Harnik and Y. Kushnir, 2010: Adjustment of the atmospheric circulation to tropical Pacific SST anomalies: Variability of transient eddy propagation in the Pacific-North America sector. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 136: 277-296. DOI: 10.1002/qj.588. PDF ABS
Seager, R., Y. Kushnir, J. Nakamura, M. Ting and N. Naik(Henderson), 2010: Northern hemisphere winter snow anomalies: ENSO, NAO and the winter of 2009/10. Geo. Res. Letters, 37(L14703): doi:10.1029/2010GL043830. PDF
Smerdon, J.E., A. Kaplan and D.E. Amrhein, 2010: Erroneous Model Field Representations in Multiple Pseudoproxy Studies: Corrections and Implications. J. Climate, 23: DOI: 10.1175/2010JCLI3742.1. PDF
Sobolowski, S., G. Gong and M. F. Ting, 2010: Modeled Climate State and Dynamic Responses to Anomalous North American Snow Cover. Journal of Climate, 23(3): 785-799. ABS
Tourre, Y.M., S. Paz, Y. Kushnir and W.B. White, 2010: Low-frequency climate variability in the Atlantic basin during the 20th century. Atmos. Sci. Let, 11: DOI: 10.1002/asl.265. PDF
Williams, G. D., S. Aoki, S. S. Jacobs, S. R. Rintoul, T. Tamura and N. L. Bindoff, 2010: Antarctic Bottom Water from the Adelie and George V Land coast, East Antarctica (140-149 degrees E). Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 115. ABS
Wu, Y., M. Ting, R. Seager, M.A. Cane and H.-P. Huang, 2010: Changes in storm tracks and energy transports in a warmer climate simulated by the GFDL CM2.1 model. Climate Dynamics: DOI 10.1007/s00382-010-0776-4. PDF
Wâhlin, A. K., X. Yuan, G. Bjork and C. Nohr, 2010: Inflow of Warm Circumpolar Deep Water in the Central Amundsen Shelf. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 40(6): 1427-1434, DOI: 10.1175/2010JPO4431.1. PDF ABS



Abstracts

Cook, E. R., R. Seager, R. R. Heim, R. S. Vose, C. Herweijer and C. Woodhouse, 2010: Megadroughts in North America: placing IPCC projections of hydroclimatic change in a long-term palaeoclimate context. Journal of Quaternary Science, 25(1): 48-61.

IPCC Assessment Report 4 model projections suggest that the subtropical dry zones of the world will both dry and expand poleward in the future due to greenhouse warming. The US Southwest is particularly vulnerable in this regard and model projections indicate a progressive drying there out to the end of the 21st century. At the same time, the USA has been in a state of drought over much of the West for about 10 years now. While severe, this turn of the century drought has not yet clearly exceeded the severity of two exceptional droughts in the 20th century. So while the coincidence between the turn of the century drought and projected drying in the Southwest is cause for concern, it is premature to claim that the model projections are correct. At the same time, great new insights into past drought variability over North America have been made through the development of the North American Drought Atlas from tree rings. Analyses of this drought atlas have revealed past megadroughts of unprecedented duration in the West, largely in the Medieval period about 1000 years ago. A vastly improved Living Blended Drought Atlas (LBDA) for North America now under development reveals these megadroughts in far greater detail. The LBDA indicates the occurrence of the same Medieval megadroughts in the West and similar-scale megadroughts in the agriculturally and commercially important Mississippi Valley. Possible causes of these megadroughts and their implications for the future are discussed. Copyright (C) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


back to top




Hickey, B. M., R. M. Kudela, J. D. Nash, K. W. Bruland, W. T. Peterson, P. MacCready, E. J. Lessard, D. A. Jay, N. S. Banas, A. M. Baptista, E. P. Dever, P. M. Kosro, L. K. Kilcher, A. R. Horner-Devine, E. D. Zaron, R. M. McCabe, J. O. Peterson, P. M. Orton, J. Pan and M. C. Lohan, 2010: River Influences on Shelf Ecosystems: Introduction and synthesis. J. Geophys. Res., 115.

River Influences on Shelf Ecosystems (RISE) is the first comprehensive interdisciplinary study of the rates and dynamics governing the mixing of river and coastal waters in an eastern boundary current system, as well as the effects of the resultant plume on phytoplankton standing stocks, growth and grazing rates, and community structure. The RISE Special Volume presents results deduced from four field studies and two different numerical model applications, including an ecosystem model, on the buoyant plume originating from the Columbia River. This introductory paper provides background information on variability during RISE field efforts as well as a synthesis of results, with particular attention to the questions and hypotheses that motivated this research. RISE studies have shown that the maximum mixing of Columbia River and ocean water occurs primarily near plume liftoff inside the estuary and in the near field of the plume. Most plume nitrate originates from upwelled shelf water, and plume phytoplankton species are typically the same as those found in the adjacent coastal ocean. River-supplied nitrate can help maintain the ecosystem during periods of delayed upwelling. The plume inhibits iron limitation, but nitrate limitation is observed in aging plumes. The plume also has significant effects on rates of primary productivity and growth (higher in new plume water) and microzooplankton grazing (lower in the plume near field and north of the river mouth); macrozooplankton concentration (enhanced at plume fronts); offshelf chlorophyll export; as well as the development of a chlorophyll “shadow zone” off northern Oregon.


back to top




Jacobs, S. S. and C. F. Giulivi, 2010: Large Multidecadal Salinity Trends near the Pacific-Antarctic Continental Margin. Journal of Climate, 23(17): 4508-4524.

Ocean temperature and salinity measurements on and near the Antarctic continental shelf in the southwest Pacific sector are evaluated for evidence of temporal change. Shelf water in the southwest Ross Sea has declined in salinity by 0.03 decade(-1) from 1958 to 2008, while its temperatures have increased in proportion to the influence of salinity on the sea surface freezing point. Modified deep-water intrusions that reach the central Ross Ice Shelf have freshened at a similar rate and cooled by similar to 0.5 degrees C since the late 1970s. Salinity has decreased by 0.08 decade(-1) in the westward coastal and slope front currents, consistent with increased melting of continental ice upstream in the Amundsen Sea. Overturning of those near-surface waters during winter sea ice formation and mixing across the slope front is sufficient to account for the 5-decade shelf water salinity change. A strong correlation between the freshening and change in the southern annular mode index suggests a link with the large-scale atmospheric circulation. Salinity has decreased by similar to 0.01 decade(-1) in bottom and lower deep waters north of the continental slope between 140E degrees and 180 degrees. Accompanying abyssal temperature changes are minor and variability is high, but density has declined along with salinity. Continued increases in water column stratification will modify the mode and formation rate as well as the properties of bottom and deep waters produced in this region.


back to top




Jenkins, A., P. Dutrieux, S. S. Jacobs, S. D. McPhail, J. R. Perrett, A. T. Webb and D. White, 2010: Observations beneath Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica and implications for its retreat. Nature Geoscience, 3(7): 468-472.

Thinning ice in West Antarctica, resulting from acceleration in the flow of outlet glaciers, is at present contributing about 10% of the observed rise in global sea level(1). Pine Island Glacier in particular has shown nearly continuous acceleration(2,3) and thinning(4,5), throughout the short observational record. The floating ice shelf that forms where the glacier reaches the coast has been thinning rapidly(6), driven by changes in ocean heat transport beneath it. As a result, the line that separates grounded and floating ice has retreated inland(7). These events have been postulated as the cause for the inland thinning and acceleration(8,9). Here we report evidence gathered by an autonomous underwater vehicle operating beneath the ice shelf that Pine Island Glacier was recently grounded on a transverse ridge in the sea floor. Warm sea water now flows through a widening gap above the submarine ridge, rapidly melting the thick ice of the newly formed upstream half of the ice shelf. The present evolution of Pine Island Glacier is thus part of a longer-term trend that has moved the downstream limit of grounded ice inland by 30 km, into water that is 300 m deeper than over the ridge crest. The pace and ultimate extent of such potentially unstable retreat(10) are central to the debate over the possibility of widespread ice-sheet collapse triggered by climate change(11,12).


back to top




Seager, R., N. Naik(Henderson) and G. A. Vecchi, 2010: Thermodynamic and Dynamic Mechanisms for Large-Scale Changes in the Hydrological Cycle in Response to Global Warming. Journal of Climate, 23(17): 4651-4668.

The mechanisms of changes in the large-scale hydrological cycle projected by 15 models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 and used for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report are analyzed by computing differences between 2046 and 2065 and 1961 and 2000. The contributions to changes in precipitation minus evaporation, P-E, caused thermodynamically by changes in specific humidity, dynamically by changes in circulation, and by changes in moisture transports by transient eddies are evaluated. The thermodynamic and dynamic contributions are further separated into advective and divergent components. The nonthermodynamic contributions are then related to changes in the mean and transient circulation. The projected change in P-E involves an intensification of the existing pattern of P-E with wet areas [the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and mid-to high latitudes] getting wetter and arid and semiarid regions of the subtropics getting drier. In addition, the subtropical dry zones expand poleward. The accentuation of the twentieth-century pattern of P-E is in part explained by increases in specific humidity via both advection and divergence terms. Weakening of the tropical divergent circulation partially opposes the thermodynamic contribution by creating a tendency to decreased P-E in the ITCZ and to increased P-E in the descending branches of the Walker and Hadley cells. The changing mean circulation also causes decreased P 2 E on the poleward flanks of the subtropics because the descending branch of the Hadley Cell expands and the midlatitude meridional circulation cell shifts poleward. Subtropical drying and poleward moistening are also contributed to by an increase in poleward moisture transport by transient eddies. The thermodynamic contribution to changing P-E, arising from increased specific humidity, is almost entirely accounted for by atmospheric warming under fixed relative humidity.


back to top




Seager, R., N. Naik(Henderson), M. Ting, M. A. Cane, N. Harnik and Y. Kushnir, 2010: Adjustment of the atmospheric circulation to tropical Pacific SST anomalies: Variability of transient eddy propagation in the Pacific-North America sector. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 136: 277-296. DOI: 10.1002/qj.588.

El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) related precipitation anomalies in North America are related to changes in the paths of storm systems across the Pacific Ocean, with a more southern route into southwestern North America during El Ninos and a more northern route into the Pacific Northwest during La Ninas. Daily reanalysis data are analyzed to confirm these changes. Seasonal mean upper tropospheric eddy statistics show, for El Ninos (La Ninas), a pattern that is shifted southward (northward) compared with climatology. Paths of coherent phase propagation of transient eddies and of the propagation of wave packets are analyzed. A coherent path of propagation across the Pacific towards North America is identified that is more zonal during El Nino winters and, during La Ninas, has a dominant path heading northeastward to the Pacific Northwest. A second path heading southeastward from the central Pacific to the tropical east Pacific is more accentuated during La Ninas than El Ninos. These changes in wave propagation are reproduced in an ensemble of seasonal integrations of a general circulation model forced by a tropical Pacific sea-surface temperature pattern, confirming that the changes are forced by changes in the mean atmospheric state arising from changes in tropical sea-surface temperature. A simplified model with a specified basic state is used to model the storm tracks for El Nino and La Nina winters. The results suggest that the changes in transient eddy propagation and the eddy statistics can be understood in terms of the refraction of transient eddies within different basic states. Copyright © 2010 Royal Meteorological Society


back to top




Sobolowski, S., G. Gong and M. F. Ting, 2010: Modeled Climate State and Dynamic Responses to Anomalous North American Snow Cover. Journal of Climate, 23(3): 785-799.

The radiative and thermal properties of widespread snow cover anomalies have the potential to modulate local and remote climate over monthly to seasonal time scales. In this study, physical and dynamical links between anomalous North American snow conditions and Northern Hemisphere climate are examined. A pair of 40-member ensemble AGCM experiments is run, with prescribed high- and low-snow forcings over North America during the course of an entire year (EY). The difference between the two ensemble averages reflects the climatic response to sustained EY snow forcing. Local surface responses over the snow forcing occur in all seasons, and a significant remote surface temperature response occurs over Eurasia during spring. A hemispheric-scale transient eddy response to EY forcing also occurs, which propagates downstream from the forcing region to Eurasia, and then reaches a maximum in extent and amplitude in spring. The evolution of this transient eddy response is indicative of considerable downstream development and is consistent with known storm-track dynamics. This transient response is shown to be a result of persistent steepened temperature gradients created by the anomalous snow conditions, which contribute to enhanced baroclinicity over the storm-track entrance regions. A second pair of experiments is run, with the prescribed high- and low-snow forcings over North America restricted to the fall season (FS). The dynamical response to FS forcing is muted compared to the EY scenario, suggesting that the seasonal timing and persistence of the snow forcing are essential for the remote teleconnection.


back to top




Williams, G. D., S. Aoki, S. S. Jacobs, S. R. Rintoul, T. Tamura and N. L. Bindoff, 2010: Antarctic Bottom Water from the Adelie and George V Land coast, East Antarctica (140-149 degrees E). Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 115.

We report on observations of dense shelf water overflows and Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) formation along the continental margin of the Adelie and George V Land coast between 140 degrees E and 149 degrees E. Vertical sections and bottom layer water mass properties sampled during two RVIB Nathaniel B Palmer hydrographic surveys (NBP00-08, December 2000/January 2001 and NBP04-08, October 2004) describe the spreading of cold, dense shelf water on the continental slope and rise from two independent source regions. The primary source region is the Adelie Depression, exporting high-salinity dense shelf water through the Adelie Sill at 143 degrees E. An additional eastern source region of lower-salinity dense shelf water from the Mertz Depression is identified for the first time from bottom layer properties northwest of the Mertz Sill and Mertz Bank (146 degrees E-148 degrees E) that extend as far as the Buffon Channel (144.75 degrees E) in summer. Regional analysis of satellite-derived ice production estimates over the entire region from 1992 to 2005 suggests that up to 40% of the total ice production for the region occurs over the Mertz Depression and therefore this area is likely to make a significant contribution to the total dense shelf water export. Concurrent time series from bottom-mounted Microcats and ADCP instruments from the Mertz Polynya Experiment (April 1998 to May 1999) near the Adelie Sill and on the upper continental slope (1150 m) and lower continental rise (3250 m) to the north describe the seasonal variability in downslope events and their interaction with the ambient water masses. The critical density for shelf water to produce AABW is examined and found to be 27.85 kg m(-3) from the Adelie Depression and as low as 27.80 kg m(-3) from the Mertz Depression. This study suggests previous dense shelf water export estimates based on the flow through the Adelie Sill alone are conservative and that other regions around East Antarctica with similar ice production to the Mertz Depression could be contributing to the total AABW in the Australian-Antarctic Basin.


back to top




Wâhlin, A. K., X. Yuan, G. Bjork and C. Nohr, 2010: Inflow of Warm Circumpolar Deep Water in the Central Amundsen Shelf. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 40(6): 1427-1434, DOI: 10.1175/2010JPO4431.1.

The thinning and acceleration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has been attributed to basal melting induced by intrusions of relatively warm salty water across the continental shelf. A hydrographic section including lowered acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements showing such an inflow in the channel leading to the Getz and Dotson Ice Shelves is presented here. The flow rate was 0.3-0.4 Sv (1 Sv equivalent to 10(6) m(3) s(-1)), and the subsurface heat loss was estimated lobe 1.2-1.6 TW. Assuming that the inflow persists throughout the year, it corresponds to an ice melt of 110-130 km(3) yr(-1), which exceeds recent estimates of the net ice glacier ice volume loss in the Amundsen Sea. The results also show a 100-150-m-thick intermediate water mass consisting of Circumpolar Deep Water that has been modified (cooled and freshened) by subsurface melting of ice shelves and/or icebergs. This water mass has not previously been reported in the region, possibly because of the paucity of historical data.


back to top




The database was updated today.

Maintained by: Virginia DiBlasi, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University