Refereed Publications
Year Author Word



2014

Ballard, T., R. Seager, J.E. Smerdon, B.I. Cook, A.J. Ray, B. Rajagopalan, Y. Kushnir, J. Nakamura and N. Henderson, 2014: Hydroclimate Variability and Change in the Prairie Pothole Region, the “Duck Factory” of North America. Earth Interactions, 18(No. 14): 1-28, DOI: 10.1175/EI-D-14-0004.1. PDF
Beltrami, H., G.S. Matharoo, L. Tarasov, V. Rath and J.E. Smerdon, 2014: Numerical Studies on the Impact of the Last Glacial Cycle on recent borehole temperature profiles: impications for terrestrial energy balance. Climate of the Past, 10: 1693-1706, doi:10.5194/cp-10-1693-2014. PDF
Camargo, S.J. , M.K. Tippett, A.H. Sobel, G.A. Vecchi and M. Zhao, 2014: Testing the performance of tropical cyclone genesis indices in future climates using the HIRAM model. J. Climate, 27: 9171-9396, doi: 10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00505.1.
Cane, M. A., E. Miguel, M. Burke, S. M. Hsiang, D. B. Lobell, K. C. Meng and S. Satyanath, 2014: Correspondence: Temperature and Violence. Nature Climate Change, 4(4): 234-235. PDF
Clifton, O. E., A. M. Fiore, G. Correa, L. W. Horowitz and V. Naik, 2014: Twenty-first century reversal of the surface ozone seasonal cycle over the northeastern United States. Geophysical Research Letters, 41(20): 7343-7350. ABS
Cochran, J. R., S. S. Jacobs, K. J. Tinto and R. E. Bell, 2014: Bathymetric and oceanic controls on Abbot Ice Shelf thickness and stability. Cryosphere, 8(3): 877-889. ABS
Cook, B.I., J.E. Smerdon, R. Seager and E.R. Cook, 2014: Pan-Continental Droughts in North America over the Last Millennium. J. Climate, 27: 383-397, DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00100.1. PDF
Cook, B.I., J.E. Smerdon, R. Seager and Sloan Coats, 2014: Global Warming and Drought in the 21st Century. Clim. Dyn.: DOI 10.1007/s00382-014-2075-y. PDF
Cook, B.I., R. Seager and J.E. Smerdon, 2014: The worst North American drought year of the last millennium: 1934. Geo. Res. Let., 41: doi:10.1002/2014GL061661. PDF
Evans, M.N., J.E. Smerdon, A. Kaplan, S.E. Tolwinski-Ward and J.F. Gonzalez-Rouco, 2014: Climate field reconstruction uncertainty arising from multivariate and nonlinear properties of predictors. Geo. Res. Let., 41: doi:10.1002/2014GL062063. PDF
Gonzalez, P. L. M., L. M. Polvani, R. Seager and G. J. P. Correa, 2014: Stratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South America. Climate Dynamics, 42(7-8): 1775-1792. ABS
Grise, K. M., S. W. Son, G. J. P. Correa and L. M. Polvani, 2014: The response of extratropical cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere to stratospheric ozone depletion in the 20th century. Atmospheric Science Letters, 15(1): 29-36. ABS
Hoerling, M., J. Eischeid, A. Kumar, R. Leung, A. Mariotti, K. Mo, S. Schubert and R. Seager, 2014: Causes and Predictability of the 2012 Great Plains Drought. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society: 269-282. PDF
Horn, M. , K. Walsh, M. Zhao, S.J. Camargo, E. Scoccimarro, H. Murakami, H. Wang, A. Ballinger, A. Kumar, D.A. Shaevitz, J.A. Jonas and K. Oouchi, 2014: Tracking scheme dependence of simulated tropical cyclone response to idealized climate simulations. J. Climate, 27: 9197-9213, doi: 10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00200.1.
Kaufman, D., K. Anchukaitis, U. Büentgen, J. Emile-Geay, M. N. Evans, H. Goosse, J. Luterbacher, J. Smerdon, M. Tingley and L. von Gunten, 2014: A Community-Driven Framework for Climate Reconstructions EOS, 95(40): 361-368. PDF
Maloney, E., S.J. Camargo, E. Chang, B. Collee, R. Fu, K. Geil, Q. Hu, X. Jiang, N. Johnson, K. Karnauskas, J. Kinter, B. Kirkman, S. Kumar, B. Langenbrunner, K. Lombardo, L. Long, A. Mariotti, J. Meyerson, K. Mo, D. Neelin, Z. Pan, R. Seager, Y. Serra, A. Seth, J. Sheffield, J. Stroeve, J. Thibeault, S.-P. Xie, C. Wang, B. Wyman and M. Zhao, 2014: North American Climate in the CMIP5 experiments. Part III: Assessment of 21st century projections. . J. Climate, 27: 2230-2270, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00273.1. PDF
Saba, G. K., W. R. Fraser, V. S. Saba, R. A. Iannuzzi, K. E. Coleman, S. C. Doney, H. W. Ducklow, D. G. Martinson, T. N. Miles, D. L. Patterson-Fraser, S. E. Stammerjohn, D. K. Steinberg and O. M. Schofield, 2014: Winter and spring controls on the summer food web of the coastal West Antarctic Peninsula. Nature Communications, 5. ABS
Seager, R. and M. Hoerling, 2014: Atmosphere and Ocean Origins of North American Droughts. J. Climate, 27: 4581-4606. PDF
Seager, R., D. Neelin, I. Simpson, H. Liu, N. Henderson, T. Shaw, Y. Kushnir, M. Ting and B.I. Cook, 2014: Dynamical and Thermodynamical Causes of Large-Scale Changes in the Hydrological Cycle over North America in Response to Global Warming. J. Climate, 27: 7921-7948, DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00153.1. PDF
Seager, R., H. Liu, N. Henderson, I. Simpson, C. Kelley, T. Shaw, Y. Kushnir and M. Ting, 2014: Causes of Increasing Aridification of the Mediterranean Region in Response to Rising Greenhouse Gases. J. Climate, 27: 4655-4675, DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00446.1. PDF
Seager, R., L. Goddard, J. Nakamura, N. Henderson and D. Lee, 2014: Dynamical causes of the 2010/11 Texas-northern Mexico drought. J. Hydrometeorology: doi: 10.1175/JHM-D-13-024.1. PDF
Shaevitz, D.A. , S.J. Camargo, A.H. Sobel, J.A. Jonas, D. Kim, A. Kuar, T.E. LaRow, Y.-K. Lim, H. Murakami, K. Reed, M.J. Roberts, E. Scoccimarro, P.L. Vidale, H. Wang, M.F. Wehner, M. Zhao and N. Henderson, 2014: Characteristics of tropical cyclones in high-resolution models of the present climate. J. Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, 6: 1154-1172, doi: 10.1002/2014MS000372.
Simpson, I.R., T.A. Shaw and R. Seager, 2014: A Diagnosis of the Seasonally and Longitudinally Varying Midlatitude Circulation Response to Global Warming. J. Atmos. Sci., 71: 2489-2515, DOI: 10.1175/JAS-D-13-0325.1. PDF
Tang, B. Y. and S.J. Camargo, 2014: Environmental control of tropical cyclones in CMIP5: A ventilation perspective. J. Adv. Model. Earth Sys., 6: 115-128, doi:10.1002/2013MS000294.
Thurnherr, A. M., S. S. Jacobs, P. Dutrieux and C. F. Giulivi, 2014: Export and circulation of ice cavity water in Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 119(3): 1754-1764. ABS
Ting, M., Y. Kushnir and L. Cuihaua, 2014: North Atlantic Multidecadal SST Oscillation: External forcing versus internal variability. J. Marine Systems, 133: 27-38, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmarsys.2013.07.006. PDF
Tippett, M.K., A.H. Sobel, S.J. Camargo and J.T. Allen, 2014: An empirical relation between U.S. tornado activity and monthly enviornmental parameters. J. Climate, 27: 2983-2999, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00345.1.
Wahl, E. R., H. F. Diaz, J. E. Smerdon and C. M. Ammann, 2014: Late winter temperature response to large tropical volcanic eruptions in temperate western North America: Relationship to ENSO phases. Global and Planetary Change, 122: 238-250, doi: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2014.08.005. PDF ABS
Wang, H. , L. Long, A. Kumar, W. Wang, J.-K. E. Schemm, M. Zhao, G.A. Vecchi, T.E. LaRow, Y.-K. Lim, S.D. Schubert, D.A. Shaevitz, S.J. Camargo, N. Henderson, D. Kim, J.A. Jonas and K.J.E. Walsh, 2014: How well do global climate models simulate the variability of Atlantic tropical cyclones associated with ENSO. J. Climate, 27: 5673-5692, doi: 10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00625.1.
Wang, J., J. Emile-Geay, D. Guillot, J. E. Smerdon and B. Rajaratnam, 2014: Evaluating climate field reconstruction techniques using improved emulations of real-world conditions. Climate of the Past, 10(1): 1-19, doi:10.5194/cp-10-1-2014. PDF ABS
Wang, S., S.J. Camargo, A.H. Sobel and L.M. Polvani, 2014: Impact of the tropopause temperature on the intensity of tropical cyclones - an idealized study using a mesoscale model. J. Atmos. Sci., 71: 4333-4348, doi: 10.1175/JAS-D-14-0029.1.
Williams, A.P., R. Seager, A.K. Macalady, M. Berkelhammer, M.A. Crimmins, T.W. Swetnam, A.T. Trugman, N. Buenning, D. Noone, N.G. McDowell, N. Hryniw, C.I. More and T. Rahn, 2014: Correlations between components of the water balance and burned area reveal new insights for predicting forest fire area in the southwest United States. International Journal of Wildland Fire: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/WF14023. PDF
Williams, A.P., R. Seager, M. Berkelhammer, A. Macalady, M. Crimmins, T. Swetnam, A. Trugman, N. Buenning, N. Hryniw, N. McDowell, D. Noone, C. Mora and T. Rahn, 2014: Causes and Implications of Extreme Atmospheric Moisture Demand during the Record-Breaking 2011 Wildfire Season in the Southwest United States. J. Appl. Meteor. Climatol, 53: 2671-2684, DOI :10.1175/JAMC-D-14-0053.1. PDF
Yang, W. C., R. Seager, M. A. Cane and B. Lyon, 2014: The East African Long Rains in Observations and Models. Journal of Climate, 27(19): 7185-7202, Doi 10.1175/Jcli-D-13-00447.1. PDF ABS
Yang, Y.-Y. and X. Yuan, 2014: The Early Winter Sea Ice Variability under the Recent Arctic Climate Shift. J. Climate, 27: 5,092-5,110, DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00536.1. PDF



Abstracts

Clifton, O. E., A. M. Fiore, G. Correa, L. W. Horowitz and V. Naik, 2014: Twenty-first century reversal of the surface ozone seasonal cycle over the northeastern United States. Geophysical Research Letters, 41(20): 7343-7350.

Changing emissions can alter the surface O-3 seasonal cycle, as detected from northeastern U.S. (NE) observations during recent decades. Under continued regional precursor emission controls (-72% NE NOx by 2100), the NE surface O-3 seasonal cycle reverses (to a winter maximum) in 21st century transient chemistry-climate simulations. Over polluted regions, regional NOx largely controls the shape of surface O-3 seasonal cycles. In the absence of regional NOx controls, climate warming contributes to a higher surface O-3 summertime peak over the NE. A doubling of the global CH4 abundance by 2100 partially offsets summertime surface O-3 decreases attained via NOx reductions and contributes to raising surface O-3 during December-March when the O-3 lifetime is longer. The similarity between surface O-3 seasonal cycles over the NE and the Intermountain West by 2100 indicates a NE transition to a region representative of baseline surface O-3 conditions.


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Cochran, J. R., S. S. Jacobs, K. J. Tinto and R. E. Bell, 2014: Bathymetric and oceanic controls on Abbot Ice Shelf thickness and stability. Cryosphere, 8(3): 877-889.

Ice shelves play key roles in stabilizing Antarctica's ice sheets, maintaining its high albedo and returning freshwater to the Southern Ocean. Improved data sets of ice shelf draft and underlying bathymetry are important for assessing ocean-ice interactions and modeling ice response to climate change. The long, narrow Abbot Ice Shelf south of Thurston Island produces a large volume of meltwater, but is close to being in overall mass balance. Here we invert NASA Operation IceBridge (OIB) airborne gravity data over the Abbot region to obtain sub-ice bathymetry, and combine OIB elevation and ice thickness measurements to estimate ice draft. A series of asymmetric fault-bounded basins formed during rifting of Zealandia from Antarctica underlie the Abbot Ice Shelf west of 94 degrees W and the Cosgrove Ice Shelf to the south. Sub-ice water column depths along OIB flight lines are sufficiently deep to allow warm deep and thermocline waters observed near the western Abbot ice front to circulate through much of the ice shelf cavity. An average ice shelf draft of similar to 200 m, 15% less than the Bedmap2 compilation, coincides with the summer transition between the ocean surface mixed layer and upper thermocline. Thick ice streams feeding the Abbot cross relatively stable grounding lines and are rapidly thinned by the warmest inflow. While the ice shelf is presently in equilibrium, the overall correspondence between draft distribution and thermocline depth indicates sensitivity to changes in characteristics of the ocean surface and deep waters.


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Gonzalez, P. L. M., L. M. Polvani, R. Seager and G. J. P. Correa, 2014: Stratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South America. Climate Dynamics, 42(7-8): 1775-1792.

On a hemispheric scale, it is now well established that stratospheric ozone depletion has been the principal driver of externally forced atmospheric circulation changes south of the Equator in the last decades of the 20th Century. The impact of ozone depletion has been felt over the entire hemisphere, as reflected in the poleward drift of the midlatitude jet, the southward expansion of the summertime Hadley cell and accompanying precipitation trends deep into the subtropics. On a regional scale, however, surface impacts directly attributable to ozone depletion have yet to be identified. In this paper we focus on South Eastern South America (SESA), a region that has exhibited one of the largest wetting trends during the 20th Century. We study the impact of ozone depletion on SESA precipitation using output from 6 different climate models, spanning a wide range of complexity. In all cases we contrast pairs of model integrations with and without ozone depletion, but with all other forcings identically specified. This allows for unambiguous attribution of the computed precipitation trends. All 6 climate models consistently reveal that stratospheric ozone depletion results in a significant wetting of SESA over the period 1960-1999. Taken as a whole, these model results strongly suggest that the impact of ozone depletion on SESA precipitation has been as large as, and quite possibly larger than, the one caused by increasing greenhouse gases over the same period.


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Grise, K. M., S. W. Son, G. J. P. Correa and L. M. Polvani, 2014: The response of extratropical cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere to stratospheric ozone depletion in the 20th century. Atmospheric Science Letters, 15(1): 29-36.

This study explores the impact of Antarctic stratospheric ozone depletion on extratropical cyclones. Output from the Community Atmosphere Model is combined with a Lagrangian cyclone-tracking algorithm to identify the response of Southern Hemisphere extratropical cyclones to ozone and greenhouse gas forcings over the period 1960-2000. Stratospheric ozone depletion induces a significant poleward shift in cyclone frequency over the Southern Ocean, but has minimal influence on cyclone intensity and lifetime. The response of the cyclones to late 20th century greenhouse gas increases has similar characteristics, but falls within the range of natural variability in the model.


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Saba, G. K., W. R. Fraser, V. S. Saba, R. A. Iannuzzi, K. E. Coleman, S. C. Doney, H. W. Ducklow, D. G. Martinson, T. N. Miles, D. L. Patterson-Fraser, S. E. Stammerjohn, D. K. Steinberg and O. M. Schofield, 2014: Winter and spring controls on the summer food web of the coastal West Antarctic Peninsula. Nature Communications, 5.

Understanding the mechanisms by which climate variability affects multiple trophic levels in food webs is essential for determining ecosystem responses to climate change. Here we use over two decades of data collected by the Palmer Long Term Ecological Research program (PAL-LTER) to determine how large-scale climate and local physical forcing affect phytoplankton, zooplankton and an apex predator along the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). We show that positive anomalies in chlorophyll-a (chl-a) at Palmer Station, occurring every 4-6 years, are constrained by physical processes in the preceding winter/spring and a negative phase of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Favorable conditions for phytoplankton included increased winter ice extent and duration, reduced spring/summer winds, and increased water column stability via enhanced salinity-driven density gradients. Years of positive chl-a anomalies are associated with the initiation of a robust krill cohort the following summer, which is evident in Adelie penguin diets, thus demonstrating tight trophic coupling. Projected climate change in this region may have a significant, negative impact on phytoplankton biomass, krill recruitment and upper trophic level predators in this coastal Antarctic ecosystem.


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Thurnherr, A. M., S. S. Jacobs, P. Dutrieux and C. F. Giulivi, 2014: Export and circulation of ice cavity water in Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 119(3): 1754-1764.

Large sectors of the Antarctic ice sheet are vulnerable to increases in melting at the bases of fringing ice shelves, with melt rates depending on ocean temperatures and circulations in the sub-ice cavities. Here we analyze an oceanographic data set obtained in austral summer 2009 in Pine Island Bay, which is bounded in the east by the calving front of the Amundsen Sea's fast-moving Pine Island Ice Shelf. The upper-ocean velocity field in the ice-free bay was dominated by a 700 m deep and 50 km wide gyre circulating 1.5 Sv of water clockwise around the bay. Ice cavity water was observed in a surface-intensified and southward-intensified boundary current along the ice front, and in a small ice cove at the end of the southern shear margin of the ice shelf. Repeat measurements in the cove reveal persistent cavity water export of approximate to 0.25 Sv during 10 days of sampling. Vertical velocities in the cove above the ice draft were dominated by buoyancy-frequency oscillations with amplitudes of several cm/s but without significant net upwelling. In combination with the seawater properties, this observation indicates that much of the upwelling occurs within fractured ice near the cove, potentially contributing to weakening the ice shelf shear margin.


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Wahl, E. R., H. F. Diaz, J. E. Smerdon and C. M. Ammann, 2014: Late winter temperature response to large tropical volcanic eruptions in temperate western North America: Relationship to ENSO phases. Global and Planetary Change, 122: 238-250, doi: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2014.08.005.

February-March temperature reconstructions in western North America from 1500-1980 in the Common Era (CE) are used to evaluate, from a regional perspective, the hypothesis that radiative forcing by large tropical volcanic eruptions induces a tendency in the climate system towards an early post-event El Ni (n) over tildeo (EN) response followed by a delayed La Ni (n) over tildea (LN) response. Post-event spatial composites using superposed epoch analysis (SEA) detect indications for an EN-like pattern in post-event Years 1-2; this result, however, is sensitive to the set of eruptions evaluated. Highly significant LN-like patterns are also observed for two eruptions during Year 1. In contrast, a clear and unique LN-like response is found in both evaluated eruption sets during Years 3-5; Year 3 in particular represents the time of strongest post-event response. No significant EN-like patterns occur during these years. The relative homogeneity of the SEA response for each post-event year is evaluated in terms of the ratio of the amplitude of the SEA composite to its standard deviation across the eruption events. In relation to the same metric determined from random-event-year SEAs, these signal-to-noise ratios are most highly significant in the portions of the domain with the strongest anomalies in Years 1-5, especially Year 3. The signal-to-noise ratios tend towards uniformly low and insignificant values beyond the first half-decade after the eruption, indicating generally reduced coherence across events. In relation to the larger-scale circulation, post-eruption 500mb February-March geopotential height composites from the 20th Century Reanalysis show ENSO-type features that are largely consistent with the SEA results from the primary eruption set during Year 1, but are inconsistent with the EN-like pattern exhibited by the second eruption set during Years 1-2. In Year 3, the pressure composite over North America and the adjacent Pacific and Atlantic is strongly LN-like, consistent with all SEA results; similarly, weakening coherence across events as rime progresses beyond Year 3 is also consistent with more variable pressure composites noted after that time. The relatively robust character of the delayed LN-like response is evaluated in terms of the dynamic rebound of the climate system towards its initial energy balance as the radiative impact of immediate post-eruption aerosol cooling dissipates. The LN-like SEA temperature response in Years 3-5 exhibits a slight shift of its southern warm anomaly to the north and west relative to pure composite LN conditions, which is detected as a specifically post-eruption feature in the region. Published by Elsevier B.V.


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Wang, J., J. Emile-Geay, D. Guillot, J. E. Smerdon and B. Rajaratnam, 2014: Evaluating climate field reconstruction techniques using improved emulations of real-world conditions. Climate of the Past, 10(1): 1-19, doi:10.5194/cp-10-1-2014.

Pseudoproxy experiments (PPEs) have become an important framework for evaluating paleoclimate reconstruction methods. Most existing PPE studies assume constant proxy availability through time and uniform proxy quality across the pseudoproxy network. Real multiproxy networks are, however, marked by pronounced disparities in proxy quality, and a steep decline in proxy availability back in time, either of which may have large effects on reconstruction skill. A suite of PPEs constructed from a millennium-length general circulation model (GCM) simulation is thus designed to mimic these various real-world characteristics. The new pseudoproxy network is used to evaluate four climate field reconstruction (CFR) techniques: truncated total least squares embedded within the regularized EM (expectation-maximization) algorithm (RegEM-TTLS), the Mann et al. (2009) implementation of RegEM-TTLS (M09), canonical correlation analysis (CCA), and Gaussian graphical models embedded within RegEM (GraphEM). Each method's risk properties are also assessed via a 100-member noise ensemble.


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Yang, W. C., R. Seager, M. A. Cane and B. Lyon, 2014: The East African Long Rains in Observations and Models. Journal of Climate, 27(19): 7185-7202, Doi 10.1175/Jcli-D-13-00447.1.

Decadal variability of the East African precipitation during the season of March-May (long rains) is examined and the performance of a series of models in simulating the observed features is assessed. Observational results show that the drying trend of the long rains is associated with decadal natural variability associated with sea surface temperature (SST) variations over the Pacific Ocean. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF), linear regression, and composite analyses all show the spatial pattern of the associated SST field to be La Nina like. The SST-forced International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) forecast models are able to capture the East African precipitation climatology, the decadal variability of the long rains, and the associated SST anomaly pattern but are not consistent with observations from the 1970s. The multimodel mean of the SST-forced models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) experiment captures the climatology and the drying trend in recent decades. The fully coupled models from the CMIP5 historical experiment, however, have systematic errors in simulating the East African precipitation climatology by underestimating the long rains while overestimating the short rains. The multimodel mean of the historical simulations of the long rains anomalies, which is the best estimate of the radiatively forced change, shows a weak wetting trend associated with anthropogenic forcing. The SST anomaly pattern associated with the long rains has large discrepancies with the observations. The results herein suggest caution in projections of East African precipitation from CMIP5 or the relationship between the East African precipitation and the SST spatial pattern found in paleoclimate studies with coupled climate models.


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The database was updated today.

Maintained by: Virginia DiBlasi, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University